Watch: The First Amendment comes to life in Pittsburgh

What does the First Amendment look like in practice? In Pittsburgh, it looks like men and women gathered in prayer at First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh, Rodef Shalom or the Islamic Center of Pittsburgh. It looks like journalists asking questions and holding those in power accountable, or demonstrators outside a federal courthouse on Grant Street protesting immigration policy.

The police officers behind the senseless killings of black men nationwide are not only bad examples, they’re dream killers

Compelling personal stories
told by the people living them.Editor’s Note: As journalists, we spend a lot of time talking with officials and community members and distilling it into stories that explore important issues of our time. But we realize that sometimes it is just more powerful to hear it straight from the source. This is one of those times. The essay is a special feature timed for Mother's Day and the Brown Mamas Monologues* happening May 12. For as long as I can remember, my son Dion has wanted to be a football player and a policeman (and a pizza maker and a race car driver).

As the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh announces mergers, here’s what it means for parishioners and church buildings left behind

In September 2017, the diocese’s On Mission Commission announced initial recommendations for whittling the number of parishes down to 48. On Thursday, April 26, Zubik will share final plans for consolidations with priests and deacons before holding a press conference on April 28 to make the decisions public. Groupings will also be shared at weekend Masses and made available online. But how are parishioners affected when the diocese closes their home churches? And what happens to church buildings once their parishioners migrate and they’re left empty?

Mark Kelly looks out over "The Run," where he has lived for nearly his entire life. (Photo by Ryan Loew/PublicSource)

The city has plans for a futuristic transit connector between Oakland and Hazelwood but residents of Four Mile Run fear disruption to their neighborhood

The city and backers of Hazelwood Green have been looking to develop some kind of transit system that would bypass a congested Second Avenue along the Monongahela River and connect it to Oakland, an area busting with university tech talent. Wedged in the middle of Oakland and Hazelwood is The Run.