To me, accessibility feels like an afterthought in Pittsburgh development

Having spinal muscular atrophy means that I’ve never been able to walk. I’ve used a wheelchair since I was about 3 years old. I rely on help from others for many parts of my day — bathing, getting dressed, making my meals and just generally getting around.
I still try to be independent however I can. Growing up, I went to public school and took classes with my peers. I lived in the dorms with the rest of the students in college. I work as a research coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh and am pursuing my master’s degree in public health.

A sign indicates the entrance to the PERSAD Center in Lawrenceville, one of the two PERSAD locations in Western Pa. (Photo by Ryan Loew/PublicSource)

How PERSAD Center is dealing with sudden leadership changes and concerns about a no-show policy for its LGBTQ patients

Under the nonprofit’s “no-show” attendance policy, clients get discharged from services if they miss three appointments in six months. This policy is not new, but PERSAD only began reviewing the policy with patients and asking them to sign it in the fall. And concern over this policy is not the only upheaval occurring at PERSAD.