Müge Finkel, an assistant professor of international development at the University of Pittsburgh, teaches a gender and development class on Tuesday. (Photo by Ryan Loew/PublicSource)

The power of one: What if that is all we need to find our common humanity?

Compelling personal stories
told by the people living them. I might have been half joking when I told my family I wanted a genetic-spit test instead of a cake to celebrate my 46th birthday. But what better way to face a midlife crisis than to discover new mysteries lurking inside my DNA? Then 11 people died a spitting distance from my living room at the Tree of Life synagogue, and I now believe genetic introspection may be a key for us all, as a society, to come to terms with what we really are. I come from a city on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey, and it was a winding journey that took me to my home now in Squirrel Hill.

Sue Kerr recognizes that she has had support throughout hard times post-hysterectomy and she wonders how others with little to no safety net are getting through hurdles and uncertainty she faced. (Photo by Ryan Loew/PublicSource)

Getting a hysterectomy in a world-class healthcare city like Pittsburgh should be easy. Trust me, it’s not.

Compelling personal stories
told by the people living them. When I learned that I would need a hysterectomy at age 47, I anticipated bumps in the road — but only of the medical sort. I didn’t foresee the ways in which institutional issues would complicate my recovery. I’m a lesbian in a 15-plus year relationship with another woman. We have no children by design.