TANF: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families is meant to help single mothers and other low-income families find and maintain employment.

SNAP: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits can be used at grocery stores, convenience stores and some farmer’s markets and co-ops.

PA WORKWEAR: For those on TANF, it provides professional attire for job interviews, employment and training.

KEYS: The Keystone Education Yields Success program helps TANF and SNAP recipients attend community college. To sign up, visit www.ccac.edu.

ELECT: Education Leading to Employment and Career Training helps people up to 22 years old who receive TANF or SNAP benefits to remain in or return to school to complete secondary education. Diana Fishlock, deputy press secretary at Pennsylvania’s Department of Human Services, says the best way to get connected to the ELECT program is through a high school’s nurse.

EARN: The Employment, Advancement and Retention Network coordinates welfare recipients with existing employment and training programs.

To get more information on the above education and work programs, call 717-787-1302. For more information on all assistance available to single mothers and low-income families, find your local county assistance office.

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Alexandra Kanik

Alexandra Kanik was a web developer and designer for PublicSource between 2011 and 2015.