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Posted inEquity, HEALTH, On the beat, posts

Pennsylvania wants more housing for the homeless, aging and poor. Here’s the state’s plan.

Overlooked communities Homelessness is expensive. In Pennsylvania, it’s become more common.

To combat this and to increase housing for Pennsylvanians who can’t afford average market-rate rent and residents in government-assisted nursing homes, the state’s Department of Human Services [DHS] today announced a five-year plan to make affordable housing easier to find.

Posted inEquity, IN-DEPTH, SALARIES DATA

Minimum-wage debate heats up in Pennsylvania

Many believe the minimum wage hasn’t kept up with the times, and movements to raise it are being led by grassroots groups and governments in communities across the nation. In June, Los Angeles became the biggest city in the country to raise its minimum wage to $15 by 2020.

Nineteen U.S. cities and counties experienced mandated wage increases this year; 29 states and Washington, D.C., already require employers to pay workers more than $7.25.

Pennsylvania isn’t part of this group – yet.

Posted inHEALTH, IN-DEPTH, Single moms

Going it alone: Low-income single moms struggle to find help, escape judgment

Rochelle Jackson had three kids and was pregnant with a son. She was also scared. Her boyfriend, the father of her children, had grown increasingly abusive during her pregnancy.

It was 1998 when she decided to press charges for physical and sexual assault, and her boyfriend went to jail. She was finally free, but now she was on her own with a growing family.

Posted inDATA, DEVELOP PGH, ECONOMY & HOUSING, EDUCATION, Equity, IN-DEPTH

Thousands of disabled workers in PA paid far below minimum wage

About 13,000 disabled Pennsylvanians are earning an average of $2.40 an hour in a legal use of subminimum wages.

Since 1986, there has been no limit to how little they can be paid.

Does this practice provide opportunities for people who wouldn’t otherwise have a job? Or does it exploit those who could work for minimum wage if given the chance?