grid of candidates in pittsburgh 2021 primary elections

Mayor, council, judges: Do you know how you’re voting in the 2021 primary election in Pittsburgh and Allegheny County?

There are several big decisions to make. Pittsburgh is electing a mayor for another four-year term, and the Pittsburgh Public School board has a flurry of candidates that could reshape the district, which has had a controversial year. Additionally, there are nine open seats in the Allegheny County Common Pleas Court, which presents a paramount opportunity for criminal justice reform in the region.

Buildings in downtown Pittsburgh can be seen from Hays Woods. (Photo by Ryan Loew/PublicSource)

Analysis: Which Pittsburgh mayoral candidate aligns with your environmental beliefs?

Pittsburgh has committed to investing billions of dollars in the coming decade to clean up its rivers and address persistent air quality challenges and increasingly heavy rains due to climate change. The next mayor of Pittsburgh could play an outsized role in determining how these problems are tackled, especially if Congress passes a new $2 trillion infrastructure package. To help our readers understand where exactly the mayoral candidates stand on issues affecting the environment, our lead environment and health reporter, Oliver Morrison, parsed through their answers from individual interviews to help readers see what their real differences are and what kind of policies they may pursue as mayor. You can read their answers or listen to the interviews in full, here or listen to a radio version of the piece produced with The Allegheny Front below. Allegheny Front · Where Pittsburgh's mayoral candidates stand on the environment
Mayor Bill Peduto
State Rep. Ed Gainey
Tony Moreno
Mike Thompson
Mayor Bill Peduto

Peduto enjoys the advantages and disadvantages of incumbency.

Clockwise from top left: State Rep. Ed Gainey, Tony Moreno, Mike Thompson, Mayor Bill Peduto.

Q&A: Pittsburgh’s mayoral candidates debate the city’s environmental challenges

Will the City of Pittsburgh revoke its parks tax? Spend more on green infrastructure to confront flooding and climate change? And should the mayor of Pittsburgh take a stand on issues that go beyond city limits, like fracking and green energy? Although the first mayoral debates focused on issues like affordable housing and policing, the four candidates offer sharply different records and plans for the city’s environmental future. PublicSource asked how the candidates would address the many environmental challenges that one would face as mayor. 

We asked the same questions to contrast their ideas and then edited down the answers to highlight their most substantial proposals and biggest areas of disagreement. 

[If you want to hear the candidates’ full answers, listen to the wide-ranging interviews here.]

Listen to the interviews

Oliver Morrison is PublicSource’s environment and health reporter.

(Photo courtesy of RE2 Robotics)

Pittsburgh tech companies took a hit but still raised $993 million last year, says report

This story was originally published by NEXTpittsburgh, a news partner of PublicSource. NEXTPittsburgh is an online publication about the people advancing the region and the innovative and cool things happening here. Sign up to get NEXTpittsburgh free. The Covid pandemic disrupted all of our lives in 2020 and changed the business model into one of working from home for many people, but it turned out to be the second-best year in a decade for investment in Pittsburgh’s tech companies. So says a new report by Ernst & Young and Innovation Works that tracks investment in the technology sector from 2011-2020. The report finds that, in total, 171 companies raised $993 million last year.

Why does Lt. Gov. John Fetterman want to run for Senate?

This story was originally published by NEXTpittsburgh, a news partner of PublicSource. NEXTPittsburgh is an online publication about the people advancing the region and the innovative and cool things happening here. Sign up to get NEXTpittsburgh free. He couldn’t look more like Western Pennsylvania if he came with French fries and coleslaw. Yes, he’s 6 feet 8 inches tall, has arms full of tattoos, is built like a linebacker and is always ready for a scrap (on Twitter, at least). But at heart, Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman (D), and former mayor of Braddock, is a Harvard-educated policy wonk, who has a tight command of the issues that he wants to address at the next level.